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A00-A09 Intestinal Infectious Fevers

Intestinal infectious diseases A00-A09 >

 

Cholera A00- >

 

Clinical Information

Acute diarrheal disease endemic in India and southeast

Asia whose causative agent is vibrio cholerae; can lead

to severe dehydration in a matter of hours unless quickly

treated.

An acute diarrheal disease endemic in India and southeast

Asia whose causative agent is vibrio cholerae. This condition

can lead to severe dehydration in a matter of hours unless

quickly treated.

Cholera is a bacterial infection that causes diarrhea.

The cholera bacterium is usually found in water or food

contaminated by feces . Cholera is rare in the United States.

You may get it if you travel to parts of the world with

inadequate water treatment and poor sanitation, and lack

of sewage treatment. Outbreaks can also happen after disasters.

The disease is not likely to spread directly from one person to

another. Often the infection is mild or without symptoms, but

sometimes it can be severe. Severe symptoms include profuse

watery diarrhea, vomiting, and leg cramps. In severe cases,

rapid loss of body fluids leads to dehydration and shock.

Without treatment, death can occur within hours. Doctors

diagnose cholera with a stool sample or rectal swab. Treatment

includes replacing fluid and salts and sometimes antibiotics.

Anyone who thinks they may have cholera should seek medical attention

immediately. Dehydration can be rapid so fluid replacement is essential.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

Clinical Information

Acute diarrheal disease endemic in India and southeast Asia whose

causative agent is vibrio cholerae; can lead to severe dehydration

in a matter of hours unless quickly treated.

An acute diarrheal disease endemic in India and southeast Asia whose

causative agent is vibrio cholerae. This condition can lead to severe

dehydration in a matter of hours unless quickly treated.

Cholera is a bacterial infection that causes diarrhea. The cholera

bacterium is usually found in water or food contaminated by feces .

Cholera is rare in the United States. You may get it if you travel

to parts of the world with inadequate water treatment and poor sanitation,

and lack of sewage treatment. Outbreaks can also happen after disasters.

The disease is not likely to spread directly from one person to another.

Often the infection is mild or without symptoms, but sometimes it can be

severe. Severe symptoms include profuse watery diarrhea, vomiting, and

leg cramps. In severe cases, rapid loss of body fluids leads to dehydration

and shock. Without treatment, death can occur within hours. Doctors diagnose

cholera with a stool sample or rectal swab. Treatment includes replacing fluid

and salts and sometimes antibiotics. Anyone who thinks they may have cholera

should seek medical attention immediately. Dehydration can be rapid so fluid

replacement is essential. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

Other salmonella infections A02- >

 

Includes

infection or foodborne intoxication due to any Salmonella species other

than S. typhi and S. paratyphi

 

Other bacterial intestinal infections A04- >

 

Type 1 Excludes

bacterial foodborne intoxications, NEC (A05.-)

tuberculous enteritis (A18.32)

 

Other bacterial foodborne intoxications, not elsewhere classified A05- >

 

Type 1 Excludes

Clostridium difficile foodborne intoxication and infection (A04.7)

Escherichia coli infection (A04.0-A04.4)

listeriosis (A32.-)

salmonella foodborne intoxication and infection (A02.-)

toxic effect of noxious foodstuffs (T61-T62)

 

Amebiasis A06- >

 

Type 1 Excludes

other protozoal intestinal diseases (A07.-)

Type 2 Excludes

acanthamebiasis (B60.1-)

Naegleriasis (B60.2)

Includes

infection due to Entamoeba histolytica

Clinical Information

A parasitic infectious disorder caused by amoebas. The parasite

may cause colitis which is manifested with bloody diarrheas,

abdominal pain, nausea and fever. In rare cases it may spread

to the liver, brain and lungs.

Infection with any of various amebae. It is an asymptomatic

carrier state in most individuals, but diseases ranging from

chronic, mild diarrhea to fulminant dysentery may occur.

Infection with any of various amebae; an asymptomatic carrier

state in most individuals, but diseases ranging from chronic,

mild diarrhea to fulminant dysentery may occur.

Applicable To

Classical cholera

ICD-10-CM A00.0 is grouped within Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v30.0):

371 Major gastrointestinal disorders and peritoneal infections with mcc

372 Major gastrointestinal disorders and peritoneal infections with cc

373 Major gastrointestinal disorders and peritoneal infections without cc/mcc

 

Viral and other specified intestinal infections A08- >

 

Type 1 Excludes

influenza with involvement of gastrointestinal tract (J09.X3, J10.2, J11.2)

 

Infectious gastroenteritis and colitis, unspecified A09- >

 

Applicable To

Infectious colitis NOS

Infectious enteritis NOS

Infectious gastroenteritis NOS

Type 1 Excludes

colitis NOS (K52.9)

diarrhea NOS (R19.7)

enteritis NOS (K52.9)

gastroenteritis NOS (K52.9)

noninfective gastroenteritis and colitis, unspecified (K52.9)

Clinical Information

A viral or bacterial infectious process affecting the large intestine.

 

A01 Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fevers

A02 Other Salmonella Infections

A03 Shigellosis

A04 Other Bacterial Intestinal Infections

A05 Other Bacterial Foodborne Intoxications-Not Elsewhere Classified

A05.9

Bacterial Foodborne Intoxication- Unspecified

A06 Amebiasis

A07 Other Protozoal Intestinal Diseases

A08 Viral & Other Specified Intestinal Infections

A09 Infectious Gastroenteritis & Colitis-Unspecified

A09

Infectious Gastroenteritis & Colitis-Unspecified

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