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A30-A49 Other Bacterial Diseases

A30 Leprosy [Hansen's Disease]

A30.9

Leprosy-Unspecified

A31 Infection due to Other Mycobacteria

A32 Listeriosis

A33 Tetanus Neonatorum

A33

Tetanus Neonatorum

A34 Obstetrical Tetanus

A34 Obstetrical Tetanus

A35 Other Tetanus

A35

Other Tetanus

A36 Diphtheria

A37 Whooping Cough

A38 Scarlet Fever

A39 Meningococcal Infection

A39.9 Meningococcal Infection- Unspecified

A40 Streptococcal Sepsis

A41 Other Sepsis

A41.9

Sepsis- Unspecified Organism

A42 Actinomycosis

A43 Nocardiosis

A44 Bartonellosis

A46 Erysipelas

 A46 Erysipelas

A48 Other Bacterial Diseases-Not Elsewhere Classified

A49 Bacterial Infection of Unspecified Site

Other bacterial diseases A30-A49 >

 

Leprosy [Hansen's disease] A30- >

 

Type 1 Excludes

sequelae of leprosy (B92)

Includes

infection due to Mycobacterium leprae

Clinical Information

A bacterial granulomatous infection caused by mycobacterium

leprae. It is a progressive disease affecting the skin, peripheral

nerves, and limbs. If untreated, it causes permanent tissue damage

leading to autoamputations.

A chronic granulomatous infection caused by mycobacterium leprae.

The granulomatous lesions are manifested in the skin, the mucous

membranes, and the peripheral nerves. Two polar or principal types

are lepromatous and tuberculoid.

Chronic granulomatous infection caused by mycobacterium leprae;

granulomatous lesions are manifested in the skin, the mucous membranes,

and the peripheral nerves; two polar or principal types are lepromatous

and tuberculoid.

 

Listeriosis A32- >

 

Includes

listerial foodborne infection

Clinical Information

A bacterial infection caused by listeria monocytogenes. It occurs

in newborns, elderly, and immunocompromised patients. The bacteria

are transmitted through ingestion of contaminated food. Clinical

manifestations include fever, muscle pain, respiratory distress,

nausea, diarrhea, neck stiffness, irritability, seizures, and lethargy.

Gram positive bacterial infection with the genus listeria including

listeria meningitis which causes clinical manifestations including

fever, altered mentation, headache, meningeal signs, focal neurologic

signs, and seizures.

Infections with bacteria of the genus listeria.

Listeriosis is a foodborne illness caused by listeria monocytogenes,

bacteria found in soil and water. It can be in a variety of raw foods

as well as in processed foods and foods made from unpasteurized milk.

Listeria is unlike many other germs because it can grow even in the

cold temperature of the refrigerator. Symptoms include fever and chills,

headache, upset stomach and vomiting. Anyone can get the illness. But it

is most likely to affect pregnant women and unborn babies, older adults,

and people with weak immune systems. To reduce your risk

use precooked and ready-to-eat foods as soon as you can

avoid raw milk and raw milk products

heat ready-to-eat foods and leftovers until they are steaming hot

wash fresh fruits and vegetables

avoid rare meat and seafood

 

Other tetanus A35- >

 

Applicable To

Tetanus NOS

Clinical Information

A disease caused by tetanospasmin, a powerful protein toxin produced

by clostridium tetani. Tetanus usually occurs after an acute injury,

such as a puncture wound or laceration. Generalized tetanus, the most

common form, is characterized by tetanic muscular contractions and

hyperreflexia. Localized tetanus presents itself as a mild condition

with manifestations restricted to muscles near the wound. It may

progress to the generalized form.

A serious infectious disorder that follows wound contamination by

the gram-positive bacterium clostridium tetani. The bacteria produce

a neurotoxin called tetanospasmin, which causes muscle spasm in the

jaw and other anatomic sites.

Disease caused by tetanospasmin, a powerful protein toxin produced by

clostridium tetani; tetanus usually occurs after an acute injury, such

as a puncture wound or laceration; generalized tetanus, the most common

form, is characterized by tetanic muscular contractions and hyperreflexia;

localized tetanus presents itself as a mild condition with manifestations

restricted to muscles near the wound.

Tetanus is a serious illness caused by tetanus bacteria. The bacteria live

in soil, saliva, dust and manure. The bacteria usually enter the body through

a deep cut, like those you might get from cutting yourself with a knife or

stepping on a nail.the infection causes painful tightening of the muscles,

usually all over the body. It can lead to "locking" of the jaw, which makes

it impossible to open your mouth or swallow. If this happens, you could die

of suffocation.if you get tetanus, there is usually a long course of treatment.

The tetanus vaccine can prevent tetanus but its protection does not last forever.

Adults should get a tetanus shot, or booster, every 10 years. If you get a bad cut

or burn, see your doctor--you may need a booster.

 

Diphtheria A36- >

 

Clinical Information

A gram-positive bacterial infection caused by corynebacterium diphtheria. It

usually involves the oral cavity, pharynx, and nasal cavity. Patients develop

pseudomembranes in the affected areas and manifest signs and symptoms of an upper

respiratory infection. The diphtheria toxin may cause myocarditis, polyneuritis,

and other systemic effects.

A localized infection of mucous membranes or skin caused by toxigenic strains of

corynebacterium diphtheriae. It is characterized by the presence of a pseudomembrane

at the site of infection. Diphtheria toxin, produced by c. Diphtheriae, can cause

myocarditis, polyneuritis, and other systemic toxic effects.

Diphtheria is a serious bacterial infection. You can catch it from a person who has

the infection and coughs or sneezes. It usually affects the nose and throat and causes

a bad sore throat, swollen glands, fever and chills. But if it is not properly diagnosed

and treated it produces a poison in the body that can cause serious complications such as

heart failure or paralysis.the diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus (dpt) vaccine can prevent

diphtheria, but its protection does not last forever. Adults should get another dose, or

booster, every 10 years. Diphtheria is very rare in the United States because of the vaccine.

Localized infection of mucous membranes or skin caused by toxigenic strains of

corynebacterium diphtheriae; it is characterized by the presence of a pseudomembrane

at the site of infection; diphtheria toxin, produced by c. Diphtheriae, can cause

myocarditis, polyneuritis, and other systemic toxic effects.

 

Whooping cough A37- >

 

Clinical Information

Whooping cough is an infectious bacterial disease that causes uncontrollable coughing.

The name comes from the noise you make when you take a breath after you cough. You may

have choking spells or may cough so hard that you vomit. Anyone can get whooping cough,

but it is more common in infants and children. It's especially dangerous for infants.

The coughing spells can be so bad that it is hard for infants to eat, drink, or breathe.

To make a diagnosis, your doctor may do a physical exam, blood tests, chest x-rays,

or nose or throat cultures.before there was a vaccine, whooping cough was one of the

most common childhood diseases and a major cause of childhood deaths in the United

States Now most cases are prevented by vaccines. If you have whooping cough, treatment

with antibiotics may help if given early.

 

Scarlet fever A38- >

Includes

scarlatina

Clinical Information

A streptococcal infection, mainly occuring among children, that is characterized by

a red skin rash, sore throat, and fever.

Infection with group a streptococci that is characterized by tonsillitis and

pharyngitis. An erythematous rash is commonly present.

 

Meningococcal infection A39- >

Clinical Information

Infections with bacteria of the species neisseria meningitidis.

Meningococci are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most frequent

is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the thin tissue that surrounds the brain

and spinal cord. Meningococci can also cause other problems, including a serious

bloodstream infection called sepsis.meningococcal infections can be spread from

person to person. They are common in people living in close quarters, such as college

students or military recruits.in its early stages, you may have flu-like symptoms and

a stiff neck. But the disease can progress quickly and can be fatal. Early diagnosis

and treatment are extremely important. Treatment is with antibiotics. Since the

infection spreads from person to person, family members may also need to be treated.a

vaccine can prevent meningococcal infections.

 

Streptococcal sepsis A40- >

 

Code First

postprocedural streptococcal sepsis (T81.4)

streptococcal sepsis during labor (O75.3)

streptococcal sepsis following abortion or ectopic or molar pregnancy

(O03-O07, O08.0)

streptococcal sepsis following immunization (T88.0)

streptococcal sepsis following infusion, transfusion or therapeutic

injection (T80.2-)

 

Other sepsis A41- >

 

Code First

postprocedural sepsis (T81.4)

sepsis during labor (O75.3)

sepsis following abortion, ectopic or molar pregnancy (O03-O07, O08.0)

sepsis following immunization (T88.0)

sepsis following infusion, transfusion or therapeutic injection (T80.2-)

 

Actinomycosis A42- >

Clinical Information

An infectious process caused by bacteria of the actinomyces species.

It is characterized by the formation of purulent and painful abscesses

in the mouth, lungs and gastrointestinal tract.

Infections with bacteria of the genus actinomyces.

 

Nocardiosis A43- >

 

Clinical Information

Gram positive bacterial infection with bacteria of the genus nocardia.

Infections with bacteria of the genus nocardia.

 

Bartonellosis A44- >

 

Clinical Information

A gram-negative bacterial infection caused by bartonella bacilliformis.

It is transmitted by ticks, flies and mosquitoes. Signs and symptoms

include fever, headache, muscle pain, enlargement of the lymph nodes

and anemia.

Infections by the genus bartonella. Bartonella bacilliformis can cause

acute febrile anemia, designated oroya fever, and a benign skin eruption,

called verruga peruana. Bartonella quintana causes trench fever, while

bartonella henselae is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis

(angiomatosis, bacillary) and is also one of the causes of cat-scratch

disease in immunocompetent patients.

 

Erysipelas A46- >

Clinical Information

An acute infection of the skin caused by species of streptococcus.

This disease most frequently affects infants, young children, and the

elderly. Characteristics include pink-to-red lesions that spread rapidly

and are warm to the touch. The commonest site of involvement is the face.

 

Bacterial infection of unspecified site A49- >

Clinical Information

An acute infectious disorder caused by gram positive or gram negative

bacteria. Representative examples include pneumococcal , streptococcal,

salmonella and meningeal infections.

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope,

they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of

1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you -

less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are

helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells,

and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy

foods like yogurt and cheese.but infectious bacteria can make you ill.

They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins,

which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause

infections include streptococcus, staphylococcus, and e. Coli.antibiotics

are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions

carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that

bacteria in your body will learn to resist them. Later, you could get or

spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure.

Infections and associated diseases caused by bacteria, general or

unspecified.

Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.

 

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