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B00-B09 Viral Infections Characterized by Skin & Mucous Membrane Lesions

B00 Herpesviral [Herpes Simplex] Infections

B01 Varicella [Chickenpox]

B02 Zoster [Herpes Zoster]

B03 Smallpox

B03

Smallpox

B04 Monkeypox

B04

Monkeypox

B05 Measles

B06 Rubella [German Measles]

B07 Viral Warts

B08 Other Viral Infections Characterized by Skin & Mucous Membrane Lesions-Not Elsewhere Classified

B09 Unspecified Viral Infection Characterized by Skin & Mucous Membrane Lesions

B09

Unspecified Viral Infection Characterized by Skin & Mucous Membrane

Lesions

Viral infections characterized by skin and mucous membrane lesions B00-B09 >

 

Herpesviral [herpes simplex] infections B00- >

Clinical Information

A group of acute infections caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2

that is characterized by the development of one or more small fluid-filled

vesicles with a raised erythematous base on the skin or mucous membrane.

It occurs as a primary infection or recurs due to a reactivation of a

latent infection. (Dorland, 27th ed.)

Herpes is an infection that is caused by a herpes simplex virus (hsv).

Oral herpes causes cold sores around the mouth or face. genital herpes

affects the genitals, buttocks or anal area. Genital herpes is a sexually

transmitted disease (std). It affects the genitals, buttocks or anal area.

Other herpes infections can affect the eyes, skin, or other parts of the

body. The virus can be dangerous in newborn babies or in people with weak

immune systems. There are two types of hsv:

hsv type 1 most commonly causes cold sores. It can also cause genital

herpes.

hsv type 2 is the usual cause of genital herpes, but it also can infect

the mouth.

hsv spreads direct contact. Some people have no symptoms. Others get

sores near the area where the virus has entered the body. They turn into

blisters, become itchy and painful, and then heal.most people have

outbreaks several times a year. Over time, you get them less often.

Medicines to help your body fight the virus can help lessen symptoms and

decrease outbreaks.

Infection caused by the herpes simplex virus; affects the skin and

nervous system; produces small temporary (but sometimes painful) blisters

on the skin and mucous membranes.

 

Varicella [chickenpox] B01- >

 

Clinical Information

A contagious childhood disorder caused by the varicella zoster virus.

It is transmitted via respiratory secretions and contact with chickenpox

blister contents. It presents with a vesicular skin rush, usually

associated with fever, headache, and myalgias. The pruritic fluid-filled

vesicles occur 10-21 days after exposure and last for 3-4 days. An

additional 3-4 days of malaise follows before the affected individual

feels better. An individual is contagious 1-2 days prior to the appearance

of the blisters until all blisters are crusted over. Generally, healthy

individuals recover without complications.

A highly contagious infectious disease caused by the varicella-zoster

virus (herpesvirus 3, human). It usually affects children, is spread by

direct contact or respiratory route via droplet nuclei, and is characterized

by the appearance on the skin and mucous membranes of successive crops of

typical pruritic vesicular lesions that are easily broken and become scabbed.

Chickenpox is relatively benign in children, but may be complicated by

pneumonia and encephalitis in adults. (from Dorland, 27th ed)

Chickenpox is an infectious disease caused by the varicella virus. Most

cases occur in children under age 15 but older children and adults can

get it. It spreads very easily from one child to another.symptoms include

an uncomfortable, itchy rash, fever and headache. The rash is like blisters

and usually appears on the face, scalp or trunk. The disease is usually mild

and lasts 5 to 10 days, but it sometimes causes serious problems. Adults

and older children tend to get sicker from it. Do not give aspirin to

anyone sick with chickenpox since the combination might cause reye

syndrome. Once you catch chickenpox, the virus usually stays in your body

forever. You probably will not get chickenpox again, but the virus can cause

shingles in adults. A chickenpox vaccine can help prevent most cases of

chickenpox, or make it less severe if you do get it.

Highly contagious infectious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus

(herpesvirus 3); usually affects children, is spread by direct contact or

respiratory route via droplet nuclei, and is characterized by the appearance

on the skin and mucous membranes of successive crops of typical pruritic

vesicular lesions that are easily broken and become scabbed; chickenpox is

relatively benign in children, but may be complicated by pneumonia and

encephalitis in adults.

 

Zoster [herpes zoster] B02- >

Includes

shingles

zona

Clinical Information

A common dermal and neurologic disorder caused by reactivation of the

varicella-zoster virus that has remained dormant within dorsal root

ganglia, often for decades, after the patient's initial exposure to

the virus in the form of varicella (chickenpox). It is characterized

by severe neuralgic pain along the distribution of the affected nerve

and crops of clustered vesicles over the area.

Acute infectious, usually self-limited, disease believed to represent

activation of latent varicella zoster virus in those who have been

rendered partially immune after a previous attack of chickenpox; it

involves the sensory ganglia and their areas of innervation and is

characterized by severe neuralgic pain along the distribution of the

affected nerve and crops of clustered vesicles over the area.

An acute infectious, usually self-limited, disease believed to represent

activation of latent varicella-zoster virus (herpesvirus 3, human) in

those who have been rendered partially immune after a previous attack

of chickenpox. It involves the sensory ganglia and their areas of

innervation and is characterized by severe neuralgic pain along the

distribution of the affected nerve and crops of clustered vesicles

over the area. (from Dorland, 27th ed)

Shingles is a disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus - the same

virus that causes chickenpox. After you have chickenpox, the virus stays

in your body. It may not cause problems for many years. As you get older,

the virus may reappear as shingles. Unlike chickenpox, you can't catch

shingles from someone who has it.early signs of shingles include burning

or shooting pain and tingling or itching, usually on one side of the body

or face. The pain can be mild to severe. Blisters then form and last from

one to 14 days. If shingles appears on your face, it may affect your vision

or hearing. The pain of shingles may last for weeks, months or even years

after the blisters have healed. There is no cure for shingles. Early

treatment with medicines that fight the virus may help. These medicines

may also help prevent lingering pain. A vaccine may prevent shingles or

lessen its effects. The vaccine is for people 60 or over.

 

Smallpox B03- >

 

Note

In 1980 the 33rd World Health Assembly declared that smallpox had been eradicated.

The classification is maintained for surveillance purposes.

Clinical Information

An acute, highly contagious, often fatal infectious disease caused by an

orthopoxvirus characterized by a biphasic febrile course and distinctive

progressive skin eruptions. Vaccination has succeeded in eradicating

smallpox worldwide.

Smallpox is a disease caused by the variola major virus. Some experts

say that over the centuries it has killed more people than all other

infectious diseases combined. Worldwide immunization stopped the

spread of smallpox three decades ago. The last case was reported

in 1977. Two research labs still house small amounts of the virus.

Experts fear bioterrorists could use the virus to spread disease.

smallpox spreads very easily from person to person. Symptoms are

flu-like and include high fever, fatigue and headache and backache,

followed by a rash with flat red sores. The United States Stopped

routine smallpox vaccinations in 1972. Military and other high-risk

groups continue to get the vaccine. The United States Has increased

its supply of the vaccine in recent years. The vaccine makes some

people sick, so doctors save it for those at highest risk of disease.

 

Monkeypox B04- >

Clinical Information

A viral disease infecting primates and rodents. Its clinical

presentation in humans is similar to smallpox including fever;

headache; cough; and a painful rash. It is caused by monkeypox virus

and is usually transmitted to humans through bites or via contact

with an animal's blood. Interhuman transmission is relatively low

(significantly less than smallpox).

 

Measles B05- >

Includes

morbilli

Clinical Information

A highly contagious infectious disease caused by morbillivirus,

common among children but also seen in the nonimmune of any age,

in which the virus enters the respiratory tract via droplet nuclei

and multiplies in the epithelial cells, spreading throughout the

mononuclear phagocyte system.

A highly contagious viral infection caused by the measles virus.

Symptoms appear 8-12 days after exposure and include a rash, cough,

fever and muscle pains that can last 4-7 days. Measles vaccines are

available to provide prophylaxis, usually combined with mumps and

rubella vaccines (mmr).

Childhood viral disease manifested as acute febrile illness

associated with cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, spots on the

buccal mucosa, and rash starting on the head and neck and spreading

to the rest of the body.

Measles is an infectious disease caused by a virus. It spreads easily

from person to person. The main symptom of measles is an itchy skin

rash. The rash often starts on the head and moves down the body. Other

symptoms include

fever

cough

runny nose

conjunctivitis (pink eye)

sometimes measles can lead to serious problems. There is no treatment

for measles, but the measles-mumps-rubella (mmr) vaccine can prevent it.

You may have heard of "german measles", also known as rubella, which

is a different illness altogether.

 

Rubella [German measles] B06- >

 

Type 1 Excludes

congenital rubella (P35.0)

Clinical Information

A viral infection caused by the rubella virus. It is initially

manifested with flu-like symptoms that last one or two days, followed

by the development of a characteristic red rash which lasts from one

to five days. The rash first appears in the neck and face. It

subsequently spreads to the rest of the body.

Acute infectious disease caused by the rubella virus and most often

affecting children and nonimmune young adults, in which the virus

enters the respiratory tract via droplet nuclei and spreads to the

lymphatic system; usually benign; however transplacental infection

of the fetus in the first trimester can cause death or severe

developmental abnormalities (congenital rubella syndrome).

An acute infectious disease caused by the rubella virus. The virus

enters the respiratory tract via airborne droplet and spreads to

the lymphatic system.

Rubella is an illness with flu-like symptoms followed by a rash.

Common symptoms include

low-grade fever

headache

runny nose

red eyes

muscle or joint pain

rubella is usually mild. You may get it and not even know it.

However, adults who get rubella often feel sicker than children do.

The biggest danger of rubella is if a woman gets it during the

first 20 weeks of pregnancy. She may lose the baby, or the

virus could cause problems to her unborn baby. Those problems

could include cataracts, deafness or damage to the heart or

brain.a virus causes rubella. It can spread from one person to

another through the air or through close contact with someone

who has it. There is no treatment for rubella, but the

measles-mumps-rubella (mmr) vaccine can prevent it.

 

Viral warts B07- >

 

Type 2 Excludes

anogenital (venereal) warts (A63.0)

papilloma of bladder (D41.4)

papilloma of cervix (D26.0)

papilloma larynx (D14.1)

Includes

verruca simplex

verruca vulgaris

viral warts due to human papillomavirus

Clinical Information

A papillomavirus related epithelial overgrowth.it can be located

anywhere on the body though when it involves the perineal region

it is generally referred to as condyloma acuminata.

A raised growth on the surface of the skin or other organ.

A wart caused by human papillomavirus. It can appear anywhere

on the skin.

Benign epidermal proliferations or tumors; some are viral in

origin.

Benign epidermal tumor caused by a papillomavirus or other agent.

Warts are growths on your skin caused by an infection with human

papilloma virus, or hpv. Types of warts include

common warts, which often appear on your fingers

plantar warts, which show up on the soles of your feet

genital warts, which are a sexually transmitted disease

flat warts, which appear in places you shave frequently

in children, warts often go away on their own. In adults,

they tend to stay. If they hurt or bother you, or if they

multiply, you can remove them. Chemical skin treatments usually

work. If not, various freezing, surgical and laser treatments

can remove warts.

 

Unspecified viral infection characterized by skin and mucous membrane lesions B09- >

 

Applicable To

Viral enanthema NOS

Viral exanthema NOS

 

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