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B50-B64 Protozoal Diseases

B50 Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria

B51 Plasmodium Vivax Malaria

B52 Plasmodium Malariae Malaria

B53 Other Specified Malaria

B54 Unspecified Malaria

B54

Unspecified Malaria

B55 Leishmaniasis

B56 African Trypanosomiasis

B57 Chagas Disease

B58 Toxoplasmosis

B59 Pneumocystosis

B59

Pneumocystosis

B60 Other Protozoal Diseases-Not Elsewhere Classified

B64 Unspecified Protozoal Disease

B64

Unspecified Protozoal Disease

Protozoal diseases B50-B64 >

 

Plasmodium falciparum malaria B50- >

 

Includes

mixed infections of Plasmodium falciparum with

any other Plasmodium species

Clinical Information

Malaria caused by plasmodium falciparum. This

is the severest form of malaria and is associated

with the highest levels of parasites in the blood.

This disease is characterized by irregularly

recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases

occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal

manifestations.

 

Plasmodium vivax malaria B51- >

Includes

mixed infections of Plasmodium vivax with other

Plasmodium species, except Plasmodium falciparum

Clinical Information

Malaria caused by plasmodium vivax. This form of

malaria is less severe than malaria, falciparum,

but there is a higher probability for relapses to

occur. Febrile paroxysms often occur every other

day.

 

Plasmodium malariae malaria B52- >

Includes

mixed infections of Plasmodium malariae with

other Plasmodium species, except Plasmodium

falciparum and Plasmodium vivax

 

Unspecified malaria B54- >

 

Clinical Information

A protozoan disease caused in humans by four

species of the plasmodium genus: plasmodium

falciparum; plasmodium vivax; plasmodium ovale;

and plasmodium malariae; and transmitted by the

 bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus

 anopheles. Malaria is endemic in parts of asia,

 africa, central and south america, oceania,

 and certain caribbean islands. It is

 characterized by extreme exhaustion

 associated with paroxysms of high fever;

 sweating; shaking chills; and anemia. Malaria

 in animals is caused by other species of plasmodia.

A protozoan infection caused by the genus plasmodium.

There are four species of plasmodium that can infect

humans: plasmodium falciparum, vivax, ovale, and malariae.

It is transmitted to humans by infected mosquitoes.

Signs and symptoms include paroxysmal high fever,

sweating, chills, and anemia.

Malaria is a serious disease caused by a parasite.

Infected mosquitoes spread it. Malaria is a major

cause of death worldwide, but it is almost wiped

out in the United States. The disease is mostly

a problem in developing countries with warm climates.

If you travel to these countries, you are at risk.

There are four different types of malaria caused

by four related parasites. The most deadly type

occurs in africa south of the sahara desert.malaria

symptoms include chills, flu-like symptoms, fever,

vomiting, diarrhea and jaundice. The disease can

be life-threatening. However, you can treat malaria

with medicines. The type of medicine depends on

which kind of malaria you have and where you were

infected. Malaria can be prevented. When traveling

to malaria-prone regions

see your doctor for medicines that protect you

wear insect repellent with deet

cover up

sleep under mosquito netting

Protozoan disease caused in humans by four species

of the genus plasmodium (p. Falciparum, p. Vivax,

p. Ovale, and p. Malariae) and transmitted by the

bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus

anopheles; malaria is endemic in parts of asia,

africa, central and south america, oceania, and

certain caribbean islands; characterized by extreme

exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high fever,

sweating, shaking chills, and anemia; malaria in

animals is caused by other species of plasmodia.

 

Leishmaniasis B55- >

 

Clinical Information

A disease caused by any of a number of species

of protozoa in the genus leishmania. There are

four major clinical types of this infection:

cutaneous (old and new world) (leishmaniasis,

cutaneous), diffuse cutaneous (leishmaniasis,

diffuse cutaneous), mucocutaneous (leishmaniasis,

mucocutaneous), and visceral (leishmaniasis, visceral).

A parasitic infection caused by protozoa of the

genus leishmania. It is transmitted to humans

via the bite of sandflies. There are three main

forms of the disease: cutaneous, mucocutaneous,

and visceral leishmaniasis. Cutaneous leishmaniasis

causes skin ulcers; mucocutaneous leishmaniasis

causes destructive lesions of the mucous membranes

of the nose, mouth, and throat; visceral leishmaniasis

is the most severe form of the disease and is

manifested with anemia, weight loss, hepatomegaly

and splenomegaly.

Disease caused by any of a number of species of

protozoa in the genus leishmania; there are four

major clinical types of this infection: cutaneous

(old and new world), diffuse cutaneous, mucocutaneous,

and visceral; visceral is characterized by fever,

chills, vomiting, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly,

leukopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, emaciation,

and an earth-gray color of the skin; cutaneous

is characterized by development of single or

 multiple localized lesions on exposed areas

 of skin that typically ulcerate.

 

 African trypanosomiasis B56- >

Clinical Information

A disease endemic among people and animals in

central africa. It is caused by various species

of trypanosomes, particularly t. Gambiense and

t. Rhodesiense. Its second host is the tsetse fly.

Involvement of the central nervous system produces

"african sleeping sickness." nagana is a rapidly

fatal trypanosomiasis of horses and other animals.

A parasitic disorder caused by protozoa of the

trypanosoma brucei species. It is transmitted by

flies and is endemic in various regions of sub-saharan

africa. Signs and symptoms include fever, joint pain,

headache, and significant swelling of the lymph nodes.

If left untreated, the parasitic infection causes

anemia, heart, kidney, and endocrine failure, and

neurologic damage. Subsequently patients develop

confusion, disruption of the sleep cycle, and

mental deterioration. The infection may lead to

coma and death.

 

Chagas' disease B57- >

 

Includes

American trypanosomiasis

infection due to Trypanosoma cruzi

Clinical Information

A parasitic infection caused by trypanosoma cruzi.

It is transmitted by insect bites. It is

characterized by an acute and chronic phase;

in the acute phase patients may have fever,

malaise, and swelling at the site of the insect

bite. In the chronic phase patients develop

hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, cardiomyopathy

and arrhythmias.

Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common

in latin america but not in the United States.

Infected blood-sucking bugs, sometimes called

kissing bugs, spread it. When an infected bug bites

you, usually on your face, it leaves behind infected

waste. You can get the infection if you rub it in

your eyes or nose, the bite wound or a cut. The

disease can also spread through contaminated food,

a blood transfusion, a donated organ or from mother

to baby during pregnancy.if you notice symptoms,

they might include

fever

flu-like symptoms

a rash

a swollen eyelid

these early symptoms usually go away. However, if

you don't treat the infection, it remains. Later,

it can cause serious intestinal and heart problems.

Medicines can kill the parasite, especially early on.

You can also treat related problems. For example, a

pacemaker helps with certain heart complications.

Infection with the protozoan parasite trypanosoma

cruzi, a form of trypanosomiasis endemic in central

and south america. It is named after the brazilian

physician carlos chagas, who discovered the parasite.

Infection by the parasite (positive serologic result

only) is distinguished from the clinical

manifestations that develop years later, such as

destruction of parasympathetic ganglia; chagas

cardiomyopathy; and dysfunction of the esophagus

or colon.

 

Toxoplasmosis B58- >

Includes

infection due to Toxoplasma gondii

Clinical Information

A parasitic disease contracted by the ingestion or

fetal transmission of toxoplasma gondii.

An infection by a parasite called toxoplasma gondii

The acquired form of infection by toxoplasma gondii

in animals and man.

Toxoplasmosis is a disease caused by the parasite

toxoplasma gondii. More than 60 million people in the

United States Have the parasite. Most of them don't

get sick. But the parasite causes serious problems

for some people. These include people with weak

immune systems and babies whose mothers become

infected for the first time during pregnancy.

Problems can include damage to the brain, eyes

and other organs. You can get toxoplasmosis from

waste from an infected cat

eating contaminated meat that is raw or not well

cooked

using utensils or cutting boards after they've

had contact with raw meat

drinking infected water

receiving an infected organ transplant or blood

transfusion

most people with toxoplasmosis don't need treatment.

There are drugs to treat it for pregnant women and

people with weak immune systems.

 

Pneumocystosis B59- >

 

Applicable To

Pneumonia due to Pneumocystis carinii

Pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jiroveci

Clinical Information

A pulmonary disease in humans occurring in

immunodeficient or malnourished patients or

infants, characterized by dyspnea, tachypnea,

and hypoxemia. Pneumocystis pneumonia is a

frequently seen opportunistic infection in aids.

It is caused by the fungus pneumocystis jirovecii.

The disease is also found in other mammals where

it is caused by related species of pneumocystis.

Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (pcp). Pneumonia

resulting from infection with pneumocystis carinii,

frequently seen in the immunologically compromised,

 such as persons with aids, or steroid-treated individuals,

 the elderly, or premature or debilitated babies during

 their first three months. Patients may be only slightly

 febrile (or even afebrile), but are likely to be

 extremely weak, dyspneic, and cyanotic. This is a

 major cause of morbidity among patients with aids.

Pulmonary disease in humans occurring in immunodeficient

or malnourished patients or infants, characterized by

dyspnea, tachypnea, and hypoxemia; pneumocystis pneumonia

is a frequent opportunistic infection in aids; also found

in other mammals where it is caused by related species

of pneumocystis.

 

Unspecified protozoal disease B64- >

 

Clinical Information

Infections with unicellular organisms formerly

members of the subkingdom protozoa.

Infections with unicellular organisms of the

subkingdom protozoa.

 

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