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B65-B83 Helminthiases

B65 Schistosomiasis [Bilharziasis]

B66 Other Fluke Infections

B66.9

Fluke Infection- Unspecified

B67 Echinococcosis

B68 Taeniasis

B69 Cysticercosis

B70 Diphyllobothriasis & Sparganosis

B71 Other Cestode Infections

B72 Dracunculiasis

B72

Dracunculiasis

B73 Onchocerciasis (River Blindness)

B74 Filariasis

B75 Trichinellosis

B75

Trichinellosis

B76 Hookworm Diseases

B77 Ascariasis

B78 Strongyloidiasis

B79 Trichuriasis

B79

Trichuriasis

B80 Enterobiasis

B80

Enterobiasis

B81 Other Intestinal Helminthiases-Not Elsewhere Classified

B82 Unspecified Intestinal Parasitism

B83 Other Helminthiases

Helminthiases B65-B83 >

 

Schistosomiasis [bilharziasis] B65- >

 

Includes

snail fever

Clinical Information

A parasitic infection caused by flukes of the genus schistosoma.

Signs and symptoms include fever, abdominal pain, eosinophilia

and hepatosplenomegaly. If left untreated it may eventually

cause liver damage leading to cirrhosis, bladder cancer and

kidney failure.

Infection with flukes (trematodes) of the genus schistosoma.

Three species produce the most frequent clinical diseases:

schistosoma haematobium (endemic in africa and the middle east),

schistosoma mansoni (in egypt, northern and southern africa, some

west indies islands, northern 2/3 of south america), and schistosoma

japonicum (in japan, china, the philippines, celebes, thailand, laos).

S. Mansoni is often seen in puerto ricans living in the United States.

Parasitic disease of tropical and subtropical countries; characterized

initially by fever, chills, and abdominal and lower back pain;

untreated patients may develop jaundice, liver cirrhosis, bladder

tumors, and kidney failure.

 

Echinococcosis B67- >

 

Includes

hydatidosis

Clinical Information

A parasitic infection caused by tapeworm larvae of echinococcus. It

affects livestock and humans. It is characterized by the formation

of hydatid cysts mainly in the liver, lungs, spleen, and kidneys.

Rupture of the cysts may lead to shock.

An infection caused by the infestation of the larval form of tapeworms

of the genus echinococcus. The liver, lungs, and kidney are the most

common areas of infestation.

 

Taeniasis B68- >

 

Type 1 Excludes

cysticercosis (B69.-)

Clinical Information

A parasitic infection caused by tapeworms of the genus taenia.

Humans are infected by eating undercooked or raw meat of infected

animals. It is usually an asymptomatic infection and patients may

become aware of the infection by noticing segments of the tapeworm

in their feces. If symptoms are present, they include nausea,

abdominal pain, indigestion, constipation, or diarrhea.

Infection with tapeworms of the genus taenia.

 

Cysticercosis B69- >

 

Includes

cysticerciasis infection due to larval form of Taenia solium

Clinical Information

A parasitic infection caused by the larval form of taenia solium.

It is a disseminated infection affecting the central nervous system,

subcutaneous tissues, lungs, heart and liver. The most serious

complications result from infection of the brain parenchyma.

Patients may develop seizures, hydrocephalus, encephalopathy and

meningoencephalitis.

Infection with cysticercus, the larval form of the various tapeworms

of the genus taenia (usually t. Solium in man). In humans they penetrate

the intestinal wall and invade subcutaneous tissue, brain, eye, muscle,

heart, liver, lung, and peritoneum. Brain involvement results in

neurocysticercosis.

 

Dracunculiasis B72- >

 

Includes

guinea worm infection

infection due to Dracunculus medinensis

Clinical Information

A parasitic infection caused by dracunculus medinensis. It is caused by

drinking water contaminated with water fleas. The larvae enter the body

through the intestine. Signs and symptoms include pain, edema,

blisters, and ulcers.

Infection with nematodes of the genus dracunculus. One or more worms

may be seen at a time, with the legs and feet being the most commonly

infected areas. Symptoms include pruritus, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea,

or asthmatic attacks.

 

Onchocerciasis B73- >

 

Includes

onchocerca volvulus infection

onchocercosis

river blindness

Clinical Information

Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites

of onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of onchocerca

are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues

including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20%

are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30%

in central america and parts of africa.

Infection with nematodes of the genus onchocerca. Characteristics include the

presence of firm subcutaneous nodules filled with adult worms, pruritus, and

ocular lesions.

Infection with nematodes of the genus onchocerca; characteristics include the

presence of firm subcutaneous nodules filled with adult worms, pruritus, and

ocular lesions.

 

Filariasis B74- >

 

Type 2 Excludes

onchocerciasis (B73)

tropical (pulmonary) eosinophilia NOS (J82)

Clinical Information

Infections with nematodes of the superfamily filarioidea. The presence of

living worms in the body is mainly asymptomatic but the death of adult

worms leads to granulomatous inflammation and permanent fibrosis. Organisms

of the genus elaeophora infect wild elk and domestic sheep causing ischemic

necrosis of the brain, blindness, and dermatosis of the face.

Infections with nematodes of the superfamily filarioidea; presence of living

worms in the body is mainly asymptomatic but the death of adult worms leads to

granulomatous inflammation and permanent fibrosis; organisms of the genus

elaeophora infect wild elk and domestic sheep causing ischaemic necrosis of

the brain, blindness, and dermatosis of the face.

 

Trichinellosis B75- >

 

Includes

infection due to Trichinella species

trichiniasis

Clinical Information

A disease due to infection with trichinae, caused by consumption of

undercooked meat containing trichinella.

A parasitic infection caused by larvae of worms of the genus trichinella.

It is transmitted to humans by ingesting raw or undercooked meat from

infected animals. Signs and symptoms include abdominal discomfort, nausea,

vomiting, fever, diarrhea, headache, coughing, myalgias, arthralgias,

and eye swelling.

An infection with trichinella. It is caused by eating raw or undercooked

meat that is infected with larvae of nematode worms trichinella genus.

All members of the trichinella genus can infect human in addition to

trichinella spiralis, the traditional etiological agent. It is distributed

throughout much of the world and is re-emerging in some parts as a public

health hazard and a food safety problem.

 

Hookworm diseases B76- >

 

Includes

uncinariasis

Clinical Information

Infection of humans or animals with hookworms other than those caused by

the genus ancylostoma or necator, for which the specific terms

ancylostomiasis and necatoriasis are available.

 

Ascariasis B77- >

 

Includes

ascaridiasis

roundworm infection

Clinical Information

Infection by nematodes of the genus ascaris. Ingestion of infective eggs

causes diarrhea and pneumonitis. Its distribution is more prevalent in

areas of poor sanitation and where human feces are used for fertilizer.

Infection with nematodes of the genus ascaridia. This condition usually

occurs in fowl, often manifesting diarrhea.

Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.

 

Strongyloidiasis B78- >

 

Type 1 Excludes

trichostrongyliasis (B81.2)

Clinical Information

Infection with nematodes of the genus strongyloides. The presence of

larvae may produce pneumonitis and the presence of adult worms in the

intestine could lead to moderate to severe diarrhea.

Infections with nematodes of the order strongylida; includes

oesophagostomiasis, hook worm infection, trichostrongyloidiasis

and equine strongylosis.

 

Trichuriasis B79- >

 

Includes

trichocephaliasis

whipworm (disease)(infection)

Clinical Information

Infection with nematodes of the genus trichuris, formerly called

trichocephalus.

 

Enterobiasis B80- >

 

Includes

oxyuriasis

pinworm infection

threadworm infection

Clinical Information

Infection with nematodes of the genus enterobius; e. Vermicularis,

the pinworm of man, causes a crawling sensation and pruritus. This

condition results in scratching the area, occasionally causing

scarification.

Infection with nematodes of the superfamily oxyuroidea.

Pinworms are parasites about the length of a staple that live in the

rectum. They are the most common worm infection in the United States.

Pinworms get inside the body when you swallow their eggs. While you

sleep, the female pinworms leave the intestines through the anus and

deposit eggs on nearby skin. This can cause intense anal itching.

Complications from pinworms are rare.people get pinworm infections

from one another. School-age children and preschoolers are most likely

to get pinworms. You do not get them from pets. If you have a mild case,

you may not need treatment. If you do need treatment, you and members of

your family usually take medicine, since pinworms are spread so easily.

 

Unspecified intestinal parasitism B82- >

 

Clinical Information

Infections of the gastrointestinal system with parasites, commonly involving

protozoa or parasitic worms.

Infections of the intestines with parasites, commonly involving parasitic

worms. Infections with roundworms (nematode infections) and tapeworms

(cestode infections) are also known as helminthiasis.

 

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